Smartphone Usage Expected to Skyrocket

 
 
By Karen A. Frenkel  |  Updated 11-28-2013 | Posted 11-27-2013 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A new study by communications technology giant Ericsson forecasts that mobile phone subscriptions will reach 9.3 billion by 2019. Over 60 percent, or 5.6 billion subscriptions, will be for smartphones. Today, smartphones represent 25 to 30 percent of all mobile phone subscriptions, according to the report. In contrast, mobile PC, tablet and mobile router subscriptions are forecast to reach a mere 750 million by 2019. To arrive at these numbers, Ericsson measured data traffic in mobile networks from the world's largest installed base of live networks. These have been collected from all regions of the world since the early days of mobile broadband. "It took more than five years to reach the first billion smartphone subscriptions, but it will take less than two to hit the 2 billion mark," says Ericsson Senior Vice President Douglas Gilstrap. "Between now and 2019, smartphone subscriptions will triple, driven by uptake in China and other emerging markets as lower-priced smartphone models become available." For more about the Ericsson Mobility Report, click here.  

 
 
 
  • Smartphone Traffic Outperform the Rest

    This year, for the first time, smartphone traffic exceeded mobile PCs, tablets and mobile routers.
    Smartphone Traffic Outperform the Rest
  • Smartphone Traffic to Rocket in Six Years

    Smartphone traffic will grow by a factor of 10 between 2013 and 2019, reaching 10 exabytes.
    Smartphone Traffic to Rocket in Six Years
  • New Mobile Subscriptions This Quarter

    There were 113 million new mobile subscriptions globally in Q3. Smartphones account for 55% of mobile phones sold during the third quarter of this year.
    New Mobile Subscriptions This Quarter
  • Mobile Versus Fixed Data Traffic

    All mobile data traffic is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 45% between 2013 and 2019. Fixed data traffic will grow 25% for the same interval.
    Mobile Versus Fixed Data Traffic
  • Top Five Countries or Regions Going Mobile

    China contributed a whopping 25% of new subscriptions, adding 30 million., Africa followed with 25 million subscriptions., Close behind with 24 million was the Asian and Pacific region., India and Latin America followed with 10 and 8 million, respectively.
    Top Five Countries or Regions Going Mobile
  • 3G and 4G Network Forecast

    90% of the world's population will use WCDMA or HSPA, a type of 3G cellular network, by 2019. Almost 65% will be covered by 4G or LTE networks.
    3G and 4G Network Forecast
  • Video a Go-Go

    Better network speeds facilitate streaming. As a result, many users—not just early adopters—watch video on mobile devices, including 41% of 65 to 69-year-olds.
    Video a Go-Go
  • Video and Gaming Drive Data Traffic

    Video drives 55% of data traffic growth annually. Today it accounts for 35% of mobile data traffic and will exceed 50% in 2019. In turn, gaming drives video. 76% of U.S. Android and iPhone users aged 15 to 69 play games on mobile devices.
    Video and Gaming Drive Data Traffic
  • Streamed Music to Their Ears

    Music streaming is becoming more popular. Ericsson expects audio traffic to increase at an annual rate of 40%, in line with total mobile traffic growth.
    Streamed Music to Their Ears
  • Social Networking and Web Services

    By 2019, social networking and Web services each will account for 10% of mobile data traffic.
    Social Networking and Web Services
  • Urban Mobile Coverage Indoors

    Radio signals attenuate rapidly as they travel through buildings, so material and height pose challenges to mobile coverage, one of the top five satisfaction factors of city life.
    Urban Mobile Coverage Indoors
  • Improving Urban Mobile Coverage

    Ericsson found that app coverage would improve by adding small cells outside buildings with metal-coated glass walls, or by deploying indoor solutions, like pico base stations.
    Improving Urban Mobile Coverage
 
 
 
 
 
Karen A. Frenkel writes about technology and innovation and lives in New York City.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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