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CIOs Grow Frustrated With Hiring Delays

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 08-31-2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    CIOs Grow Frustrated With Hiring Delays
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    CIOs Grow Frustrated With Hiring Delays

    It's taking more than a month to hire IT professionals these days—too long for many CIOs, as the delays result in many candidates taking a job with competitors.
  • Previous
    Slow Process
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    Slow Process

    41% of the CIOs surveyed said the hiring process for IT staff jobs takes longer than they'd like.
  • Previous
    Extended Vacancy, Part I
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    Extended Vacancy, Part I

    On average, CIOs said it takes 4.5 weeks to fill these jobs.
  • Previous
    Extended Vacancy, Part II
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    Extended Vacancy, Part II

    27% said it takes up to three months to fill IT staff jobs.
  • Previous
    Biggest Barriers to Hiring Tech Talent
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    Biggest Barriers to Hiring Tech Talent

    Candidates seek higher salaries than can be offered: 44%. There's a lack of qualified candidates: 33%. Company is not viewed as employer of choice: 21%.
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    Pet Peeve
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    Pet Peeve

    57% of the professionals surveyed said a long post-interview wait to hear whether they got an offer is the most frustrating aspect of job searches.
  • Previous
    Tight Deadline
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    Tight Deadline

    69% of workers said they'd wait up to two weeks after an interview to get a status update before losing interest in the job, and 23% said they'd wait only one week.
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    Best Practice: Be Prepared
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    Best Practice: Be Prepared

    Work with your team to determine the skills and experience most needed. Conduct research to find out what qualified candidates are seeking in salaries, benefits and incentives.
  • Previous
    Best Practice: Open the Process
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    Best Practice: Open the Process

    Involve those team members in the interviews because their input can help make better decisions. With candidates, be totally transparent about the hiring process and job requirements.
  • Previous
    Best Practice: Move Quickly
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    Best Practice: Move Quickly

    Don't allow too much time to pass between interviews, status updates, internal discussions and, of course, the job offer.
 

A notable share of CIOs said the hiring process is taking too long, according to a recent survey from Robert Half Technology. In fact, it typically takes well over a month—and sometimes up to three months—to bring a candidate on board. This puts CIOs in a difficult position, with vacancies lingering due to an inability to meet salary demands, as well as a lack of qualified applicants. Employers also hurt themselves by not proactively and regularly communicating with candidates after their interviews, causing many top prospects to lose interest—and possibly move on to a competitor. "The hiring process is often the first impression a candidate has with a company and can set the tone for the relationship," said John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology. "Don't let a long and complicated hiring process or a lower-than-market compensation package leave an unfavorable impression with a job seeker. Keep the experience positive by presenting a competitive salary and moving quickly to make an offer." More than 2,500 U.S. CIOs and 1,000 workers took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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